Effects of level of brackish water on feed intake, digestion, and heat energy with growing Boer and Spanish goat wethers

TitleEffects of level of brackish water on feed intake, digestion, and heat energy with growing Boer and Spanish goat wethers
Publication TypeConference Proceedings
Year of Conference2016
AuthorsTsukahara, Y, Puchala, R, Sahlu, T, Goetsch, AL
Conference NameInternational Conference on Goats
Pagination208
AbstractTwenty Boer (6.1 mo and 21.3 kg) and 20 Spanish goat wethers (6.6 mo and 19.7 kg) were used to determine effects of levels of brackish (BR) and fresh water on feed intake, digestion, and heat energy. BR had 6900, 1884, 75, 1854, 2478, and 9 mg/l of total dissolved salts, Ca, Mg, chloride, sulfate, and boron, respectively. BR levels were 0 (0-BR), 33 (33-BR), 67 (67-BR), and 100% (100-BR). Water and a moderate quality grass hay (8.5% CP and 68% NDF) were offered free-choice. The experiment consisted of 14 days of adaptation, 5 days for metabolizability measures, and 2 days for determining gas exchange and heat energy. There were no interactions (P > 0.05) between breed and water treatment. Water (897, 906, 911, and 851 g/day; SE = 58.3) and DM intakes (525, 556, 571, and 527 g/day for 0-BR, 33-BR, 67-BR, and 100-BR, respectively; SE = 31.0) were similar among treatments (P = 0.883 and 0.667, respectively). Urinary water was greater for BR treatments than for fresh water (P = 0.003; 211, 317, 319, and 285 g/day; SE = 25.6) and water in feces was similar among treatments (P = 0.530; 247, 251, 276, and 257 g/day for 0-BR, 33-BR, 67-BR, and 100-BR, respectively; SE = 19.0), implying less water loss by other means such as evaporation when BR was consumed. Total tract OM digestibility was lower (P = 0.049) for treatments with than without BR (64.2, 61.5, 58.6, and 59.3%; SE = 1.86), although ME intake was similar among treatments (P = 0.940; 4.61, 4.57, 4.60, and 4.31 MJ/day for 0-BR, 33-BR, 67-BR, and 100-BR, respectively; SE = 0.394). Daily heat energy in kJ/kg BW0.75 was less with than without BR (P = 0.001; 474, 436, 446, and 445; SE = 7.7), although values in MJ were similar among treatments (P = 0.588; 4.36, 4.12, 4.22, and 4.18 for 0-BR, 33-BR, 67-BR, and 100-BR, respectively; SE = 0.124). BW of wethers consuming BR decreased less than that of wethers consuming fresh water (P = 0.006; -37, -14, -7, and -16 g/day; SE = 7.2), but recovered energy was similar among treatments (P = 0.923; 0.25, 0.45, 0.38, and 0.13 MJ/day for 0-BR, 33-BR, 67-BR, and 100-BR, respectively; SE = 0.356). In conclusion, BR inclusion in drinking water had a number of effects, but it does not appear that consumption of this source would adversely impact performance of growing meat goats.