Performance of Spanish and Boer×Spanish doelings consuming diets with different levels of broiler litter

TitlePerformance of Spanish and Boer×Spanish doelings consuming diets with different levels of broiler litter
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsNegesse, T, Patra, AK, Dawson, LJ, Tolera, A, Merkel, RC, Sahlu, T, Goetsch, AL
JournalSmall Ruminant Research
Volume69
Issue1-3
Pagination187 - 197
Date PublishedJan-05-2007
ISSN09214488
Abstract

Sixty Spanish (S) and 40 Boer x Spanish (BS) doelings (14.9 ñ 3.8 and 21.9 ñ 3.8 kg initial BW, respectively, and approximately 6 months of age) were used in an experiment with four 3-week periods to determine effects of dietary broiler litter (L) level on growth performance. There were two groups per treatment with six S and four BS doelings in each. Dietary treatments were 20% coarsely ground millet hay and 80% concentrate, which consisted of 0 (0L), 20 (20L), 40 (40L), or 60% L (60L; total dietary level). An additional treatment was 80% hay and 20% concentrate (80F). Concentrate (primarily corn and L when included) DM intake (DMI) was 700, 593, 652, 387, and 165 g/d (SE = 20.3) and total DMI was 883, 755, 825, 490, and 696 g/d (SE = 35.5) for 0L, 20L, 40L, 60L, and 80F, respectively. There was a dietary treatment x period interaction in ADG (period 1: 104, 29, 36, -44, and 47 g; period 2: 124, 102, 53, -74, and 12 g; period 3: 175, 126, 126, 87, and 80 g; period 4: 161, 151, 136, 66, and 51 g for 0L, 20L, 40L, 60L, and 80F, respectively (SE = 12.2)). Treatment and genotype also interacted in ADG (S: 107, 85, 72, 8, and 36 g; BS: 174, 118, 103, 10, and 60 g for for 0L, 20L, 40L, 60L, and 80F, respectively (SE = 9.2)). ADG:DMI ranked (P < 0.06) 0L > 20L > 40L > 80F > 60L (152, 130, 102, 18, and 65 g/kg for 0L, 20L, 40L, 60L, and 80F, respectively; SE = 6.12). The acetate:propionate ratio in ruminal fluid was greater (P < 0.05) for 60L and 80F than for other treatments (1.60, 1.73, 2.18, 3.80, and 3.67 for 0L, 20L, 40L, 60L, and 80F, respectively; SE = 0.27). Liver Cu concentration at the end of the experiment was influenced by dietary treatment (88, 275, 478, 286, and 47 ppm for 0L, 20L, 40L, 60L, and 80F, respectively; SE = 53.2). In conclusion, L can be effectively used in diets for growing meat goats, but high levels, such as above 40% of dietary DM, may restrict performance primarily via limited feed intake. However, the level of L below this threshold impacts efficiency of feed utilization.

URLhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0921448806000228
DOI10.1016/j.smallrumres.2006.01.008
Short TitleSmall Ruminant Research