Predator Management

Ken Cearley - Texas Cooperative Extension - Canyon - Texas A & M University

Unit Objective

After completion of this module of instruction the producer should be able to use and recognize the damage done to a goat operation by predators and to develop alternative approaches for management of predators. The producer should distinguish between management of predator by using lethal and non lethal tools. The producer should be able to score a minimum of 85% on the module test.

Specific Objectives

After completion of this instructional module the producer should be able to:

  1. State the significance of predator damage to sheep and goats in Texas in 2003.
  2. Select three points to consider when objectively evaluating the physical evidence of predation.
  3. Distinguish between predator eradication and predator control.
  4. State the meaning of predator management.
  5. Identify the five basic components of integrated pest management.
  6. Distinguish between lethal and non lethal tools for predator management alternatives.
  7. State skills a goat producer should master when interpreting predator evidence.
  8. Identify the mode of attach by certain predators.
  9. Identify signs/symptoms that a predator issue may be by the coyote.
  10. Identify signs/symptoms that a predator issue may be by the bobcat.
  11. Identify signs/symptoms that a predator issue may be by the red fox.
  12. Identify signs/symptoms that a predator issue may be by the feral hog.
  13. Identify signs/symptoms that a predator issue may be by the domestic and feral dog.
  14. Select acceptable control measures a producer may use for controlling the following category of predators:
    • Coyotes
    • Bobcats
    • Red Foxes
    • Feral Hogs
    • Domestic and Feral Dogs

Preface

This curriculum is aimed at providing a sufficient level of awareness of the challenges and opportunities of predator management to allow goat producers to successfully operate in the face of predation threats. Critical thinking is a tool to enable one to know when to respond and how to respond to suspected predation. Knowing which tools to use and under what circumstances is essential. Completing this module should enable the student to start down the road toward successful predator management.

Module Contents

  • Introduction
    • The Problem
    • Evolution of Expectation and Terminology
    • Development of Strategies
  • Approach
    • Integrated Pest Management
    • Pest versus Beneficials
    • Scouting
    • Econonic Thresholds
    • Management Alternatives
    • Environmental Effects
  • Interpreting Evidence
    • Tools Needed
  • Species Profiles
    • Coyotes
    • Bobcats
    • Mountain Lions
    • Red Foxes
    • Feral Hogs
    • Domestic and feral Dogs
  • Concluding Comments
  • Recommended References
  • PDF Versions

    You may download this module in PDF format.

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